R.I.P. thread

And The Beatles wouldn't have existed had it not been for Elvis who wouldn't have existed had it not been for Arthur Crudup who wouldn't have existed blah blah blah.

No one is denying that The Beatles were the most influential band in the history of popular music but their use of synthesisers is most certainly not what they will be remembered for.
I get that but then I wasn't suggesting they were the first to use synthesisers (what about the Moody Blues and their "Melletron"?), only that they were using them long before Kraftwerk.
 
Yes. Another one gone. He influenced so many artists. When Bob Dylan graduated from High School, he wrote in his Yearbook "gone to join Little Richard". And, along with Elvis, Buddy Holly, and Carl Perkins, he Little Richard was a formative influence on the Beatles.
 
Bruce Dickinsons wife has been found dead at their family home, following their split. Paddy Bowen was said to have died yesterday in a tragic accident. She was in line for half his £90 million fortune.
And Bruce is going out with a fitness instructor in her 40’s, 90 million you say !
love Bruce, saw him with Samson, the band he was with before iron maiden, all very sad, and the timing is horrendous for the family, no doubt the papers will love this .
 
No doubt they will but it does have the makings of a good Agatha Christie story so far.
And he has a big aircraft repair business operating out of rhoose, near Cardiff airport, doing Boeing type aircraft , I’d imagine that’s not doing too well at the moment, and iron maiden can’t tour neither, the plot thickens!
 
Yes. I see now. "Novachord" is printed on that record label. Well spotted
You might enjoy this - currently on BBC 6 Music and BBC Sounds.


The History of the Bleep

Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Hear the first baby's cry of the moog synthesiser, embrace the difficult childhood of prog rock, grapple with the 'experimental' teenage years of the New Romantics and discover the middle-aged maturity and nostalgia of the present day.

The series features interviews with many of the key players in the development of electronic music including Robert Moog, Kraftwerk's Ralph Hutter, Radiohead's Johnny Greenwood, Factory's Tony Wilson, Thomas Dolby, the Human League, Primal Scream, A Guy Called Gerald, Zoot Woman and Grandaddy.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00t6s9g
 
You might enjoy this - currently on BBC 6 Music and BBC Sounds.


The History of the Bleep

Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Hear the first baby's cry of the moog synthesiser, embrace the difficult childhood of prog rock, grapple with the 'experimental' teenage years of the New Romantics and discover the middle-aged maturity and nostalgia of the present day.

The series features interviews with many of the key players in the development of electronic music including Robert Moog, Kraftwerk's Ralph Hutter, Radiohead's Johnny Greenwood, Factory's Tony Wilson, Thomas Dolby, the Human League, Primal Scream, A Guy Called Gerald, Zoot Woman and Grandaddy.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00t6s9g
Thanks. I'll check it out.
 
American guitarist Bob Kulik. Most people I am guessing will not know the name but most will have heard some of his work.
Mostly a session guitarist, but also a writer, his work included Kiss, WASP, Michael Bolton, Lou Reed, Diana Ross and Meat Loaf.
Fans of the AOR genre will probably best know him for Balance and his iwn band Skull.
 
Angelis' portrayals of the world-weary Chrissie Todd in both of the "Blackstuff" series were outstanding. Bleasdale not only caught the moment and the desperation for a lot of working people during the Thatcher years, he shoved it in your face.
First noticed him as Lucien in the Liver Birds.
 
One of the few dramas I watch with sadness in my heart as it was filmed in my home city. In the plays it was the story of a few, but in real life it was the story of thousands around the country.

I recall working in a job centre and asking a chap of about 55 if he had ever been there before. He hesitated then said with tears in his eyes ‘I’ve never been unemployed before.’
 
One of the few dramas I watch with sadness in my heart as it was filmed in my home city. In the plays it was the story of a few, but in real life it was the story of thousands around the country.

I recall working in a job centre and asking a chap of about 55 if he had ever been there before. He hesitated then said with tears in his eyes ‘I’ve never been unemployed before.’
I suppose I am one from the last of the "lucky" generation who could leave school either with a job already secured or at least find a job almost immediately after leaving.
 
I suppose I am one from the last of the "lucky" generation who could leave school either with a job already secured or at least find a job almost immediately after leaving.
I was so lucky, I got to do what I love all my working life and was never made redundant. My brother, on the other hand earned more money than I did early in his working life, but spent long periods on the dole, which affected his mental health (although that wasn't talked about in the 70s and 80s!)
 
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There was a row at the time about who came up with the riff first. The Sweet or Bowie for The Jean Jeanie. Possibly they both nicked it from The Yardbirds.

... who adapted the Bo Diddley original.
Bo Diddley described the Yardbirds version as "beautiful". His song was inspired by Muddy Waters "Hoochie Coochie Man".

So many early British R&B groups recorded cover versions of American blues/R&B numbers - it was open and accepted. Variations of the best riffs from these numbers reappear in later British music but as earnings in the music business started to skyrocket artists started to get possessive of every note that they claim to have originated.
 
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... who adapted the Bo Diddley original.
Bo Diddley described the Yardbirds version as "beautiful". His song was inspired by Muddy Waters "Hoochie Coochie Man".

So many early British R&B groups recorded cover versions of American blues/R&B numbers - it was open and accepted. Variations of the best riffs from these numbers reappear in later British music but as earnings in the music business started to skyrocket artists started to get possessive of every note that they claim to have originated.
Nice info :hi: Just been reading Hoochie Coochie Man was originally a Willie Dixon song. This songs got some history !
 
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Nice info :hi: Just been reading Hoochie Coochie Man was originally a Willie Dixon song. This songs got some history !
I'm not surprised.

Many of the early American R&B numbers were copies or adaptations of blues numbers from greats like Willie Dixon. In the early 60s I was lucky enough to see several of these original old blues artists perform live at an "American Negro Blues Festival" event at Fairfield Hall Croydon (don't blame me for the un-PC event title).:D
 
Paul ‘Tonka’ Chapman. Best know for his work with UFO after he was drafted in after Schenker threw the first of his hissy fits and left the band. A proud Welshman his first ‘name’ band was Lone Star who managed two albums before management issues caused them to split. Nicknamed Tonka as he seemed almost indestructable despite apparently something happening to him to cause an injury almost weekly.

 
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Paul ‘Tonka’ Chapman. Best know for his work with UFO after he was drafted in after Schenker threw the first of his hissy fits and left the band. A proud Welshman his first ‘name’ band was Lone Star who managed two albums before management issues caused them to split. Nicknamed Tonka as he seemed almost indestructable despite apparently something happening to him to cause an injury almost weekly.
:(

Never knew that was why he was called 'Tonka' - makes sense when you think about it!
 
See that Cuban singer Margarita Pracatan, best known for her appearances on Clive James' TV show, died on Tuesday at the age of 89.... a really talented singer!!!! .. but above all an entertainer....

for the younger members .. here she is with Tom Jones on the Clive James show .. it's not unusual!!! ..she was

just saw this too, she was a scream on the Clive James show. Sad but she did live to a good age.
 
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I'm not surprised.

Many of the early American R&B numbers were copies or adaptations of blues numbers from greats like Willie Dixon. In the early 60s I was lucky enough to see several of these original old blues artists perform live at an "American Negro Blues Festival" event at Fairfield Hall Croydon (don't blame me for the un-PC event title).:D
I guess then it wasny unpc.?.....things an attitudes change normality but they canny rewrite history.........?
 
I guess then it wasny unpc.?.....things an attitudes change normality but they canny rewrite history.........?
It certainly didn't seem problematic at the time.

There was much more interest in black American blues artists in the UK than there was back in the States. British bands listened, adapted and played their music and John Peel got it onto mainstream radio whereas a lot of it got ghettoised onto black music stations in the States.
 
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