Pedestrian ethics: Impressionable infant edition.

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173
#1
You are in a rush and on foot. You approach a pedestrian crossing. A woman is waiting to cross with a young child of perhaps 4yrs at her side. The green man is not flashing but there is a gap in the traffic of sufficient size to allow you - an adult with an athletic gait - to cross without being mown down.

Q Do you cross the road before the green man flashes?
 
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#3
You are in a rush and on foot. You approach a pedestrian crossing. A woman is waiting to cross with a young child of perhaps 4yrs at her side. The green man is not flashing but there is a gap in the traffic of sufficient size to allow you - an adult with an athletic gait - to cross without being mown down.

Q Do you cross the road before the green man flashes?
It depends, at the end of the day the mother just has to explain to her child that Im a very naughty lady who should have waited , thats if Im in a hurry. If Im not in a hurry then no I would wait.
 
#7
personally the parent should be teaching their kids in these instances

who is to say its even safe to walk when the green man is on, as there are plenty of fuds who will drive through the red light regardless
 
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#9
I would wait as even though it's the parents responsibility they do say it takes a village to raise a child and if one adult says one thing but another does the opposite it can confuse that child. I don't want to be the cause for a child ignoring a it's mother and running across the road when unsafe just because they saw me, an adult who should lead by example do exactly that.
 
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#11
As I am not of an athletic gait there is a fair chance that I would fail to make it across and get splattered ! At least I could die in the knowledge that I had given the child a graphic and lasting lesson in the importance of road safety !
 
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#12
I would cross the road if I consider it safe to cross for myself regardless of whether or not I was in a rush.

To directly answer the larger implicit question - whether I feel an obligation to serve as a role model to every child I might encounter? No, absolutely not. We are all individuals and responsible for our own actions.

If you choose to have kids you accept all the risks and responsibilities that entails - don't expect society to do your job for you.
 
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#13
I would cross the road if I consider it safe to cross for myself regardless of whether or not I was in a rush.

To directly answer the larger implicit question - whether I feel an obligation to serve as a role model to every child I might encounter? No, absolutely not. We are all individuals and responsible for our own actions.

If you choose to have kids you accept all the risks and responsibilities that entails - don't expect society to do your job for you.
For me the last few lines is everything that is wrong with society nowadays. Years ago your neighbours or anyone else who knew your family would tell kids off for misbehaving or try to encourage them to do right. Now it's not my problem you chose to have them. The community no longer exists as people have become more self absorbed and no longer give a damn about other people. Where I lived even ten years ago we all kept an eye on everyone else including their kids. We knew if an elderly neighbour became unwell and it was never left for the police to find them dead after a week. Someone would pop round everyday to make sure all was well. We would take it in turns to watch the kids play out. If we saw another child do wrong we would pull them on it then call their parents. As I said it takes a village to raise a child and we should be aware how our actions can affect kids regardless of what their parents say. Especially the very young who struggle to understand. Loss of community is what is so wrong in this country. No one has time or cares enough to ensure the safety of that community
 
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#15
Scenario the second

You are going for a morning stroll. Ahead of you, walking in the same direction, is a very aged man. He is wearing trainers and a tracksuit and clearly putting down a lot of effort. This walk of his clearly constitutes a workout for him.

You do not know this ancient fella but you do know of him from others: fine gentleman; decorated war hero; tremendous athlete in his prime; widower.

At your current walking speed you will overtake him very readily.

Q Do you maintain your current walking speed?
 
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#16
In this scenario I would hang back somehow (pretend to tie shoe laces or something).

Alternatively find another route.

He may well not give a shit about me passing him, but I would feel uncomfortable!
 
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#17
In this scenario I would hang back somehow (pretend to tie shoe laces or something).

Alternatively find another route.

He may well not give a shit about me passing him, but I would feel uncomfortable!
I'd probably do the same, although if I was the old man I wouldn't give it a second thought if someone did overtake me.
 
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#19
For me in the Second Scenario I would probably try and match his walking pace and have a chat with him if he's able to as Walking with someone is more pleasureable than Walking alone.
 
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#20
For me the last few lines is everything that is wrong with society nowadays. Years ago your neighbours or anyone else who knew your family would tell kids off for misbehaving or try to encourage them to do right. Now it's not my problem you chose to have them. The community no longer exists as people have become more self absorbed and no longer give a damn about other people. Where I lived even ten years ago we all kept an eye on everyone else including their kids. We knew if an elderly neighbour became unwell and it was never left for the police to find them dead after a week. Someone would pop round everyday to make sure all was well. We would take it in turns to watch the kids play out. If we saw another child do wrong we would pull them on it then call their parents. As I said it takes a village to raise a child and we should be aware how our actions can affect kids regardless of what their parents say. Especially the very young who struggle to understand. Loss of community is what is so wrong in this country. No one has time or cares enough to ensure the safety of that community
Clearly you grew up in some idyllic little village somewhere Dani. Growing up in Tottenham 40 years ago I only knew two of my neighbours by name. If any of them - or anyone else for that matter - tried to offer us "guidance" or tell us off we'd tell them to fuck off. All part of the fun of city life. There are no communities in big cities - just collections of unrelated strangers.

I do have some experience of the kind of "village community" you are talking about as my mum was raised in a little village in Ireland and she hated going home there - everyone in each other's pockets, gossiping about each other's business - she detested it so maybe she was only too happy for the anonymity that city life brings. And maybe no surprise that I consider it none of my neighbours business what I get up to, and why I have zero interest in their affairs.

"Community living" - let's all just be one big happy family and sit round the fire and sing "kum ba yah". :vomit: No thanks.
 
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#21
Scenario the second

You are going for a morning stroll. Ahead of you, walking in the same direction, is a very aged man. He is wearing trainers and a tracksuit and clearly putting down a lot of effort. This walk of his clearly constitutes a workout for him.

You do not know this ancient fella but you do know of him from others: fine gentleman; decorated war hero; tremendous athlete in his prime; widower.

At your current walking speed you will overtake him very readily.

Q Do you maintain your current walking speed?
I speed up and overtake him giving him plenty of space. He was an athlete and war hero and made of sterner stuff than you seem to think. He's not some pathetic creature to be pitied and condescended to.
 
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#22
Clearly you grew up in some idyllic little village somewhere Dani. Growing up in Tottenham 40 years ago I only knew two of my neighbours by name. If any of them - or anyone else for that matter - tried to offer us "guidance" or tell us off we'd tell them to fuck off. All part of the fun of city life. There are no communities in big cities - just collections of unrelated strangers.

I do have some experience of the kind of "village community" you are talking about as my mum was raised in a little village in Ireland and she hated going home there - everyone in each other's pockets, gossiping about each other's business - she detested it so maybe she was only too happy for the anonymity that city life brings. And maybe no surprise that I consider it none of my neighbours business what I get up to, and why I have zero interest in their affairs.

"Community living" - let's all just be one big happy family and sit round the fire and sing "kum ba yah". :vomit: No thanks.
Obviously you cannot understand the difference between living as part of a community and 'community living' as you put it. There is no point in me trying to explain it either as it takes someone who holds themselves responsible for their actions in their community to be able to understand. Those with the 'it's nothing to do with me' mentality will never comprehend the responsibilities we all have as adults to help others even in the simplest of ways such as reinforcing a mother who is telling a toddler it is dangerous to cross when the green man is not showing
 
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#23
Obviously you cannot understand the difference between living as part of a community and 'community living' as you put it. There is no point in me trying to explain it either as it takes someone who holds themselves responsible for their actions in their community to be able to understand. Those with the 'it's nothing to do with me' mentality will never comprehend the responsibilities we all have as adults to help others even in the simplest of ways such as reinforcing a mother who is telling a toddler it is dangerous to cross when the green man is not showing
I think your definition of community is just old-fashioned. The model you talk about might have made sense a few generations back where people lived in the same village/town their whole life and therefore had an investment in it.

I don't consider my community to be the people who live on my street / village because as I said I live in a city and have lived in various parts of it over the years, so no point in getting too attached. I have never known the names of more than two or three families on any street I've lived on, and prefer it that way. I have neither the time nor the energy to act as a role model to a bunch of complete strangers.

The people I consider to be my "community" are my family, friends and peers who are geographically dispersed and always have been.

Possibly if I had kids I might feel differently, I might also feel entitled to impose on others my own personal values and insist that they take responsibility for my offspring, who I gave birth to out of my own personal choice - but that still wouldn't make it right.
 
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