Charity begins..... where?

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1,416
#1
Just had a meeting with the Parish clerk about the minutes for next week’s council meeting.

We always get requests from organisations for donations to their charity, and always try to focus on things that are relevant to the Parish or local area.
Food bank, pop-in sessions, citizens advice, scouts, brownies etc, breakfast clubs, bowls club, wildlife charities and the mum and baby sessions are all whom have had donations in the past.
Usually we get 2 or 3 per month.

I was stunned to find over 40 requests to sift through. Some were small businesses seeking help, others wanting start up funds (neither of which we are permitted to get involved with) but what did surprise me was theatres and cinemas from many miles away sending in requests. One place is 90 minutes drive away and is part of a large organisation!!!

I know times are very hard, and I in particular am missing live music, but it was very concerning how many things are in trouble.

We are supposed to discuss each application at council meetings but I have sent details out to all councillors to narrow it down to 5.

Have members here found more chatity requests in the post/emails etc?
 
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2,284
#2
No, I actually got refunded by some charities & regeneration trusts that I invest in :unknown:
They had decided that their work was non-essential and they would cease their activities until after covid-19.

This may not be wholly typical but is linked to the general decline in things that are happening.
 
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#7
Do some / any of these organisations especially the larger ones have shareholders?
Have they taken a dividend this year?
Have they been asked to refund / refinance rather than the parish/ council organisation that you work with.
Blimey, I had not given any of that a thought. Thanks.

The general consensus from the coucillors so far is, in addition to our usual ones, is to support things like the Air Ambulance, holiday kids clubs and the like. While some of the bigger ones are worthy causes we feel as a small council we should keep it local.
 
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#8
Watching the dave channel during top gear is a magnet for charity ads.
Nadia Sawahli? Doing money appeal for water in Africa, donkey's in turkey appeal and safa armed forces appeal.
All back to back.
With people still on furlough and record numbers using food banks, charity needs to begin at home until you can pay your own bills.
I do have a direct debit for the wwf saying that.
And that's for the animals charity, not the Wet n Wild Fanny club you dirty fuckers are thinking of.
 
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1,416
#9
Watching the dave channel during top gear is a magnet for charity ads.
Nadia Sawahli? Doing money appeal for water in Africa, donkey's in turkey appeal and safa armed forces appeal.
All back to back.
With people still on furlough and record numbers using food banks, charity needs to begin at home until you can pay your own bills.
I do have a direct debit for the wwf saying that.
And that's for the animals charity, not the Wet n Wild Fanny club you dirty fuckers are thinking of.
A few weeks into Lockdown and almost every ad break featured a betting company and a charity appeal.

Now this Wet n Wild charity you mentioned, link?
 
#10
I have some experience from the other side, one problem is charities can't run their usual fundraisers and of course cash collection boxes will be fairly empty. Some will be reliant on client/user donations.

One consideration may be for the value of the people who run the charities, the volunteers who also benefit from taking part, giving their time and skills. This is underrated in my opinion, and expands the benefit. A charity I have great knowledge of with has longer term plans, was ok going in, has low overheads (no-one is paid, the office was already virtual via phones and email) and has made the effort to apply for government (at all levels) grants one of which they have received. As long as lock-down restrictions ease, and usual activities can resume going forward should be fine.

So how do you decide I would look at the long-term sustainability as well as overall benefit to providers as well as users.
 
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1,416
#12
I have some experience from the other side, one problem is charities can't run their usual fundraisers and of course cash collection boxes will be fairly empty. Some will be reliant on client/user donations.

One consideration may be for the value of the people who run the charities, the volunteers who also benefit from taking part, giving their time and skills. This is underrated in my opinion, and expands the benefit. A charity I have great knowledge of with has longer term plans, was ok going in, has low overheads (no-one is paid, the office was already virtual via phones and email) and has made the effort to apply for government (at all levels) grants one of which they have received. As long as lock-down restrictions ease, and usual activities can resume going forward should be fine.

So how do you decide I would look at the long-term sustainability as well as overall benefit to providers as well as users.
Thanks Ruth, points I will take to the next council meeting.

The special needs gardening group I help run has had more requests from the volunteers than clients to get involved since lockdown, so you make a vital point.

We have opened the parish hall ‘under the radar’ for the food bank to make it easier and safer for the volunteers. The moment the larger space was available more of the reg volunteers felt safer to return.
Minimal cost, maximum benefit.
 
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1,416
#14
Something I have found out since running the Parish hall is how many charities get charged to use locations.
I was astounded to find out that the Blood Transfusion service gets charged by the local professional football club to use their facility.

They have been offered the free use of our hall since I took over and used it twice last year.

We have a range if charges depending on the organisation, but in effect not many local groups or people end up paying anything.
 
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1,930
#15
Also, if you have time, we’ll worth reading https://melindacousins.com/2014/01/29/can-we-please-stop-saying-charity-begins-at-home/

Key points

it’s not from the Bible
It is from the 17thC when “charity” meant a sort of love (think “faith, hope and charity”
Read in context it means “learning charity begins at home”
Another annoyance regarding the misuse of language is Samaritan which is from the Bible.

Being a Samaritan doesn't mean doing a good deed and perhaps feeling good in yourself.

The person who you help has to be someone who you hate, utterly dislike. Otherwise you're just being a normal person.
 
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2,284
#16
Also, if you have time, we’ll worth reading https://melindacousins.com/2014/01/29/can-we-please-stop-saying-charity-begins-at-home/

Key points

it’s not from the Bible
It is from the 17thC when “charity” meant a sort of love (think “faith, hope and charity”
Read in context it means “learning charity begins at home”
When I hear people talk about ‘helping our own people instead of foreigners’, a few questions will always, and I mean always, support policies that would make poor people in Britain worse off. So they are generally arseholes rather than people ‘proving’ that aid or charity is bad.

(Some of it is misspent but the answer to that is to run it better, rather than listening to ‘charity begins at home’ people, none of whom have anything worthwhile to say.

As to what is in the bible, this is.(I believe ‘publicans’ are people who worked as tax collectors for the roman empire & were a byword for disagreeable people).

That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust. For if ye love them which love you, what reward have ye? do not even the publicans the same?
 
#18
I stopped supporting big charities years ago. The ones where the CEO is earning more than the Prime Minister. I got sick of them ringing me every month, asking to increase my donation.

I gave my money and more importantly my time to smaller charities than are run by volunteers. Where every penny given is hugely appreciated and every penny goes to helping someone. Where I see first hand the good it’s doing. The charity I help out, has seen an increased demands for our services.
 
#19
I stopped supporting big charities years ago. The ones where the CEO is earning more than the Prime Minister. I got sick of them ringing me every month, asking to increase my donation.

I gave my money and more importantly my time to smaller charities than are run by volunteers. Where every penny given is hugely appreciated and every penny goes to helping someone. Where I see first hand the good it’s doing. The charity I help out, has seen an increased demands for our services.
I changed my will to replace a charity who I will not name, but had received some bad publicity about the amount of funds spent on NDAs / severances as well as bullying. I looked at the accounts with a magnifying glass and wages ( particularly directors) were a massive portion of the turnover.
 
Messages
2,284
#20
I stopped supporting big charities years ago. The ones where the CEO is earning more than the Prime Minister. I got sick of them ringing me every month, asking to increase my donation.

I gave my money and more importantly my time to smaller charities than are run by volunteers. Where every penny given is hugely appreciated and every penny goes to helping someone. Where I see first hand the good it’s doing. The charity I help out, has seen an increased demands for our services.
Why not join the wildlife trust for the county you live in (London, Bham & other cities also have them).
You can literally see your money at work :hi:
 
#23
When I hear people talk about ‘helping our own people instead of foreigners’, a few questions will always, and I mean always, support policies that would make poor people in Britain worse off. So they are generally arseholes rather than people ‘proving’ that aid or charity is bad.

(Some of it is misspent but the answer to that is to run it better, rather than listening to ‘charity begins at home’ people, none of whom have anything worthwhile to say.

As to what is in the bible, this is.(I believe ‘publicans’ are people who worked as tax collectors for the roman empire & were a byword for disagreeable people).

That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust. For if ye love them which love you, what reward have ye? do not even the publicans the same?
For the avoidance of doubt, we agree. I was only tackling the foundations of the “charity begins at home” argument, not the merits of the morality built on it. There are, as you say, no such merits.
 
#24
Do some / any of these organisations especially the larger ones have shareholders?
Have they taken a dividend this year?
Have they been asked to refund / refinance rather than the parish/ council organisation that you work with.
Totally agree. Some of these charities (mainly the larger ones) pay disgraceful salaries to their directors. And some of the “famous” charity trusts set up after the death of a loved one etc are so inefficient it’s not worth supporting. You really need to look to where you’re money is going.

And don’t forget a lot of these websites (justgiving being one) take a cut of all monies raised. So if anyone does a fundraiser, don’t automatically put it up on there. Think about doing it in a more efficient way - often directly with the charity. Also, don’t forget gift aid if you’re a UK taxpayer (no comment on who might and might not pay tax here :lol:).
 
#25
As a supporter of two charities I was slightly taken aback when a chap attempted his well versed charity mugging routine on me with a creepy grin one sunny day regarding another animal charity,I stopped and listened then quite literally ran in the opposite direction as he tried to strong arm me for my bank details.
Street fundraising folks know who to approach,it's all psychological at the end of the day and they are trained in understanding body language nuances etc etc.
A lot of these so called altruistic charities are anything but, research is key.
 
#26
I find it frustrating that people believe charity equates to giving money. I know a few charity organisations who don't need money, but more so help from people to aid their efforts for things like deliveries or cooking etc.

I both donate monthly and did, give my time for an organisation, which unfortunately, didn't do a lot of its fundraising due to COVID.

I'm still employed so I do feel guilty particularly as other businesses and industries have collapsed. However, I find it sad that it's always charities who are the first to be affected when times get bad.

I believe that if there's something that requires help/support its our duty to help, but with everything happening, I just can't see how we can support everyone without the government getting involved. The fear is with really partisan politics at the moment it'll be a "them vs. us" time thing.
 
#27
As a supporter of two charities I was slightly taken aback when a chap attempted his well versed charity mugging routine on me with a creepy grin one sunny day regarding another animal charity,I stopped and listened then quite literally ran in the opposite direction as he tried to strong arm me for my bank details.
Street fundraising folks know who to approach,it's all psychological at the end of the day and they are trained in understanding body language nuances etc etc.
A lot of these so called altruistic charities are anything but, research is key.
I used to work in London and walked down Tottenham Court Road most days. The number of different charity bandits out was astounding, anything up to 6 different charities in a 10 minute walk. I just tell them I don’t give on the street, don’t hand out details, and are welcome to give me a leaflet to peruse when I am not tired, hot and sweaty and drained after a 10 hour shift in that big green hospital building just across the road.
 
#28
I find it frustrating that people believe charity equates to giving money. I know a few charity organisations who don't need money, but more so help from people to aid their efforts for things like deliveries or cooking etc.

I both donate monthly and did, give my time for an organisation, which unfortunately, didn't do a lot of its fundraising due to COVID
A lot of charities out my way just need people, as you say they do have money but not the means to use it to the bedt advantage
 
#29
A lot of charities out my way just need people, as you say they do have money but not the means to use it to the bedt advantage
Agreed.

Without giving too much away, many charities just need what I would class as 'overhead' support like a business.

The will, good cause and effort is there from the people who wanna help on the front line, but all the other 'overhead' stuff goes out the window, like making sure their accounts are in order (following the latest accounting rules), they're not getting mugged off on contracts/subcontracts, the taxman and law is being followed, having someone with a bit of savvy to negotiate rates etc and things like data protection/GDPR are being followed.

Like said above, it's these things that catch them out and when it hits the headlines, all the goodwill and effort by the front line workers, who genuinely give up their time and money, goes out the window.

I used to work in London and walked down Tottenham Court Road most days. The number of different charity bandits out was astounding, anything up to 6 different charities in a 10 minute walk. I just tell them I don’t give on the street, don’t hand out details, and are welcome to give me a leaflet to peruse when I am not tired, hot and sweaty and drained after a 10 hour shift in that big green hospital building just across the road.
Yeah I always hated these people and avoided them at cost, however, even that in itself was an industry that employed people e.g. young students who'd get a cut of commission and earn some money.
 
#30
I used to work in London and walked down Tottenham Court Road most days. The number of different charity bandits out was astounding, anything up to 6 different charities in a 10 minute walk. I just tell them I don’t give on the street, don’t hand out details, and are welcome to give me a leaflet to peruse when I am not tired, hot and sweaty and drained after a 10 hour shift in that big green hospital building just across the road.
Charity bandits .
I probably shouldn't but 😆
On a serious note, both Central and Inner London are extremely high profile regarding fundraising on the streets, I appreciate bills have to be paid but, jumping out at folks is not the one.
Many view it as a means to an end and no real interest in the charity they represent!
 
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