Book club

Anyone got a crime book (fiction if possible), where they've been unable to put it down?

I have a few I picked up recently, but nothing about them made me wanna keep reading.

Loved Power of the Dog and Night Manager if that helps
 
Anyone got a crime book (fiction if possible), where they've been unable to put it down?

I have a few I picked up recently, but nothing about them made me wanna keep reading.

Loved Power of the Dog and Night Manager if that helps
I really like the Angela Marsons and Kimberley Chambers books. Not taxing reading in any way but really enjoyable in my opinion.

And I've said many a time about the Orphan X books by Greg Hurwitz. Not crime but absolutely excellent 😃
 
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Anyone got a crime book (fiction if possible), where they've been unable to put it down?

I have a few I picked up recently, but nothing about them made me wanna keep reading.

Loved Power of the Dog and Night Manager if that helps
I really liked the Berlin Noir books by Philip Kerr. The first three in one publication is excellent.
 
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3,336
Anyone got a crime book (fiction if possible), where they've been unable to put it down?

I have a few I picked up recently, but nothing about them made me wanna keep reading.

Loved Power of the Dog and Night Manager if that helps
Ian Rankin's Rebus series.
Can't beat Mario Puzo's The Godfather
If you're looking for something a little bit different, try the Joe Pickett series by C.J. Box
 
Just starting Believe Me by JP Delaney. Pervious novels I’ve read, ’The girl before’ was excellent and ‘The perfect wife’ was just weird so wonder how this one is going to turn out?
 
Anyone got a crime book (fiction if possible), where they've been unable to put it down?

I have a few I picked up recently, but nothing about them made me wanna keep reading.

Loved Power of the Dog and Night Manager if that helps
Most of Val McDermid crime stuff is well worth a read, some can be very twisted mind, and agree with @Benromach that the Rebus novels are gripping, best read in chronological order.
 
I really like the Angela Marsons and Kimberley Chambers books. Not taxing reading in any way but really enjoyable in my opinion.

And I've said many a time about the Orphan X books by Greg Hurwitz. Not crime but absolutely excellent 😃
Well the first of the Orphan X books is being delivered to my Kindle now. Will be next on the list after I finish ‘Believe Me’
 
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Some further recommendations are anything by James Ellroy - particularly the Underworld USA trilogy - American Tabloid, The Cold Six Thousand and Blood’s A Rover - hardboiled American crime noir with quite unique prose voicing. He also wrote L.A. confidential.
 
I really like the Angela Marsons and Kimberley Chambers books. Not taxing reading in any way but really enjoyable in my opinion.

And I've said many a time about the Orphan X books by Greg Hurwitz. Not crime but absolutely excellent 😃
I really liked the Berlin Noir books by Philip Kerr. The first three in one publication is excellent.
Ian Rankin's Rebus series.
Can't beat Mario Puzo's The Godfather
If you're looking for something a little bit different, try the Joe Pickett series by C.J. Box
Most of Val McDermid crime stuff is well worth a read, some can be very twisted mind, and agree with @Benromach that the Rebus novels are gripping, best read in chronological order.
Thank you. Thorough selection here, I think I have a battered old version of the godfather that I've never read somewhere (only seen the films), so think that might be my first start and will try to work my way through the others.
 
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Just realised I was talking bollocks about Gregg Hurwitz contributing to the Wire - that was Dennis Lehane.

If you like thrillers where there is a series to get your teeth into then David Baldacci is well worth looking into - the King and Maxwell series (6 books), Camel Club series (5 books), John Puller series (4 books), Will Robbie (5 boooks) and Amos Decker series (6 books) are worth a look - with the benefit that I don’t think any of them have been made into films.
 
If you like American hard boiled try Charles Willeford. Bought the farm in 1988 but left plenty of reading material:
Miami Blues (the book not the film)
Kiss Your Ass Goodbye
and many others..

Also Donald E Westlake, another dearly departed..a good starter would be: Goodbye scheherazade
 
Also...Damon Runyon

American writer and Journo. He practically invented a comic language of Hoofers, grifters and petty crooks that is often heard in old black & white Noir B movies. Also used with comic effect in movies like Millers Crossing

His collected works in two books:

Runyon From First to Last

Damon Runyon On Broadway

I’m re-reading From First to Last,
 
J

Justin Quarantino

Guest
Five chapters in to Derren Brown’s ‘Happy’, really good, entertainingly written exploration of the concept of happiness. Already planning on reading up on the various philosophers discussed so far.
 
Like Korey and pip1968 I also have read the Orphan X series by Gregg Hurwitz .. an excellent series of escapism thrillers, and the next installment is due out later this year I think ...

however, if you really want a great read and an emotional rollercoaster then a different genre and a great book (soon to be a film) is The Nightingale
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a really great story of 2 french women in WWII surviving and fighting back in different ways ... I thoroughly recommend.
 
Gladly so. By August the Death cases in Brasil should be lower per capita than in Chile. (which did have a strict lockdown)

Can you explain such a paradox? Go ahead!
1. I don't believe that will be the case - lets wait until August to judge that
2. The Chileans are more honest in recording deaths as Covid-related than are the Brazilians.
3. Chile has a larger proportion of its population in older age groups
 
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I've been so busy for the last 18 months that I've struggled to maintain the concentration to read much more than a tweet. So I thought I would dip in to graphic novels for a change of scene.

Currently reading Maus, a retelling of the Holocaust with the Jews as mice and the Nazis as cats. Amazing piece of work!

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Lady in Waiting........Anne Glenconner

Helen Bonham Carter was about to play the part of Princess Margaret in the Crown. Nancy Carol was to play Princess Margaret’s friend and Lady in Waiting Anne Glenconner. Helen Bonham Carter wanted to known more of The part she was to play and took along the actress was to play her lady in waiting.
This book came about from that meeting that she had done with the two actresses and realised she had done so much in her 90 years and what a life she had lived with one of the biggest party girl of the time.
Heard about this watching day time tv whilst on furlough and I remember my mother loving Princess Margaret and laughing at the things she got up to.
Good book enjoy :thumbsup:


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Reamde by Neal Stephenson. Quite a clever thriller that covers everything from gaming through hacking then the Russian Mafia and throws some Islamic terrorists into the mix. Recommended 👍
 
Four and a bit months it's taken me to get just over half way through Peter Crouch's 'How to be a Footballer'

I know a moderately intelligent four year old could crack this off in a day or two but despite having some way to go it's been mildly amusing so far.
 
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Read before or first time?
This is the first time i read consider phlebas but i had read other culture books before.
Banksy is a master though there are some unanswered questions in the first book, such as WHY horza hates the culture so much that, despite knowing what the idirans are like, he still fights for them anyway :unknown:

Howbeit, it's a fine book that I;m well into and will finish at the weekend.
 
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This is the first time i read consider phlebas but i had read other culture books before.
Banksy is a master though there are some unanswered questions in the first book, such as WHY horza hates the culture so much that, despite knowing what the idirans are like, he still fights for them anyway:unknown:

Howbeit, it's a fine book that I;m well into and will finish at the weekend.
It's a long time since I read that book but if I remember correctly, his reason boils down to "man vs machine" and he'd rather be on the side of man. (I'm aware that the Idirans aren't human but the principle remains the same).
 
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Some of my favourite books
Imajica - Clive Barker
Lanark: A life in four books Alasdair Gray
Thursday Next series- Jasper Fforde
The Brentford trilogy - Robert Rankin
Nearly all of Terry Pratchetts books
Necroscope series- Brian Lumley
 
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Love re-reading old favourites.. Absolute Beginners and Peyton Place been mine, first read both as a teenager.
And both adapted to either the silver and small screens - I haven’t read Absolute Beginners, but a novel that also depicts that somewhat ‘day in the life‘ of Londoner’s is London Belongs To Me by Norman Collins - about the inhabitants of a large boarding house just before the War - this was also adapted for the SilverScreen (with David Attenborough) and also the telly.
 
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It's a long time since I read that book but if I remember correctly, his reason boils down to "man vs machine" and he'd rather be on the side of man. (I'm aware that the Idirans aren't human but the principle remains the same).
The Idirans are leave and the culture are remain ;)
 
Lanny. I like Max Porter's style of writing. It isn't really prose in the typical sense, neither is it poetry, sort of like vox pops in literary form. Some clever observations on hoe peoole approach disappearances of children.
 
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I'm halfway through I'll Be Gone In The Dark by Michelle McNamara. It's about her investigation and obsession with catching the 'East Area Rapist/Original Night stalker/Golden state killer'. HBO has just made a docuseries on the book, so I plan to finish reading it before I start watching that.
 
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The Fist of God - Frederick Forsyth from 1994. Thriller about an Iraqi supergun, called the Fist of God and various sub -plots set during the Persian Gulf war.
 
I'm halfway through I'll Be Gone In The Dark by Michelle McNamara. It's about her investigation and obsession with catching the 'East Area Rapist/Original Night stalker/Golden state killer'. HBO has just made a docuseries on the book, so I plan to finish reading it before I start watching that.
Excellent series of Audible series of podcasts on the hunt for the East Area Rapist/Night stalker/Golden State killer ("Evil has a name")
 
And both adapted to either the silver and small screens - I haven’t read Absolute Beginners, but a novel that also depicts that somewhat ‘day in the life‘ of Londoner’s is London Belongs To Me by Norman Collins - about the inhabitants of a large boarding house just before the War - this was also adapted for the SilverScreen (with David Attenborough) and also the telly.
Exactly the sort of thing I enjoy reading.. will track down a copy.
 
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Rereading books from my shelves - just started Labyrinth by Kate Mosse - a Grail based conspiracy thriller set in 1209 and 2005 (and don't ask me what it is like because I can't remember reading it first time around, there's a fold on page 111, so maybe I didn't finish it - I'll let you know).
Apparently there was a tv adaptation which aired on Channel 4 in 2012 - which I didn't see.
 
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