Book club

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Books on history i enjoyed

Barbarossa The Russian-German Conflict 1941-1945 - Alan Clark
THUG The True Story Of India's Murderous Cult - Mike Dash
Alan Turing Enigma The Incredible Story Of The Man Who Cracked The Code - Anna Revell
Scapegoats Of The Empire The True Story Of The Bushveldt Carbineers - George Witton
 
Anything by Flann O'Brian, pen name of Brian O'Nolan aka Brian Ó Nuallain or Myles na gCopaleen
good starting point is The Third Policeman, or The Dalkey Archive. Be prepared to laugh a lot..
 
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I am not a fan of reading novels,but these books are ok i've read.

A Kestrel For A Knave - Barry Hines
Of Mice And Men - John Steinbeck
The Exorcist - William Peter Blatty
All Fall Down - John Saul


I prefer books on history,films and tv,sport and music.


Oh yeah,and the Kamasutra.
 
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The New Right by Michael Malice, easy read that explains the shift in US political dynamics and the success of the new right (obviously)

Also reading a book of selected Tennyson works, not impressed really 😱
 
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Just finished my third Flashman novel by George MacDonald Fraser in a row. Completely brilliant. So tempted to head straight into another one but maybe a change would be good. I will see if the latest Bernard Cornwell is down in price on Kindle now. I refuse to pay more for a kindle book than what the hardback costs.
 
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Just finished my third Flashman novel by George MacDonald Fraser in a row. Completely brilliant. So tempted to head straight into another one but maybe a change would be good. I will see if the latest Bernard Cornwell is down in price on Kindle now. I refuse to pay more for a kindle book than what the hardback costs.
It’s w awhile since I read a book on Harry Flashman
 
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Remembering Shanghai - by Isabel Sun Caao and her daughter Claire Chao

Isabel's memories of Shanghai from her great grandfather's time in 19th century China through her upbringing in Shanghai; from the Japanese invasion, WW2 and the Communist era.

Reads like a novel, so fast moving yet entertaining too. Not finished it yet but the best book I've read in a long time.
 
William Shirer’s The Rise And Fall Of The Third Reich.
At school my History O level sylabus was Europe 1899-1949. Lots to take in so I thought this year I would try to read a little more depth about individual subjects.

At over 1200 pages it is a fascinating insight into how the Nazis craftily bulldozed their way to power then abused it.
They changed everything from the church to the education system and just about everything in between.

My fave quote so far is someone calling Hitler ‘that scruffy Austrian vagabond.’
 
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Saw this on the local news about a Polish cavalry officer Witold Pileck who volunteered to go to Auschwitz. It tells the story how he deliberately got rounded up by the Nazi's in Warsaw to find out for the Polish resistance what was happening at the concentration camp. His story tells off the horrors and transition from a work camp to concentration camp and finally a death camp for Jews from the whole of Europe. It raises some awkward questions as to why the British and Americans ignored the existence of death camps until much later in the war, even though there was 1100 British POW there. A good first hand account if you're interested into that sort of thing.
 
Presently read The Lewis Man by Peter May. I like all of May’s books whether they are set in France, China or the Outer Hebrides. He does his research.

I‘ve set myself a challenge however to reread Les Misérables by Victor Hugo, it took me months to read it the last time, going to try and do it in a month this time.
 
Presently read The Lewis Man by Peter May. I like all of May’s books whether they are set in France, China or the Outer Hebrides. He does his research.

I‘ve set myself a challenge however to reread Les Misérables by Victor Hugo, it took me months to read it the last time, going to try and do it in a month this time.
Did you read The Man With No Face?
 
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Rory Stewart's account of walking the borders, some with his father (who dies during the book) and some alone. Doing what I like to do, taking the temperature of a place by walking round and speaking to folk, but on bigger scale.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2...-stewart-review-brian-border-england-scotland

I've already bought his other books on the strength of this and it's a shame he doesn't seem to be getting into high office, as he is one of the few politicians who has actually done things and has ideas worth listening to.
 
Rory Stewart's account of walking the borders, some with his father (who dies during the book) and some alone. Doing what I like to do, taking the temperature of a place by walking round and speaking to folk, but on bigger scale.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2...-stewart-review-brian-border-england-scotland

I've already bought his other books on the strength of this and it's a shame he doesn't seem to be getting into high office, as he is one of the few politicians who has actually done things and has ideas worth listening to.
An utter tit who'll be presenting granny fodder on the telly before the year's out.

An example par excellence of the uselessness of the English middle class.
 
Usually have a couple of books on the go at any one time - one fiction and one non-fiction (work-related book club). Also listen to a lot of audio books whilst driving and exercising - never quite feel I have read a book until I have physically read it though. Will often do both.

Currently
Non-fiction - just finished "The 100 Year Life" about how work patterns are changing and how people/society/employers and the government need to react. Has completely changed my thoughts, conversations and advice to my kids and junior colleagues on how they approach careers. Excellent 3 mins summary graphic on youtube.
Starting "Talking to strangers - what we should know about people we don't know" by Malcolm Gladwell. Very promising so far and about how and why we are often deceived by others.

Fiction: Ben Aaronovitch's Peter Grant series starting with the "Rivers of London" - fantastic books about a tiny (2 member) branch of the Met that deals with the paranormal. Has also given me a whole new appreciation of the geography of London.

Audio book: just finished "David Copperfield" as wanted to before seeing the movie. Before that had just gone through the entire "Sharpe" series on audio and will do the same with the Saxon books as well. Bernard Cornell also has a really interesting take on the Arthurian legend starting with the Winter King. Well worth a try if you like his books
 
Jon Sopel's 'A Year At The Circus- Inside Trump's White House' which is even better than his previous book 'If Only They Didnt Speak English'.

The book is worth the price alone for Omarosa Newton's tale about when she walked into the Oval Office and discovered Trump and Michael Cohen locked in conversation and what the President did next!
 
It's taken nearly six months but I've finally managed to finish reading a book, namely 'I Robot', by Peter 'Crouchy' Crouch.

I know that a moderately intelligent five year old would knock this off in a few hours but it's a start and it's been an entertaining read.
 
A

alissaantoine

Guest
Ooh I love that this is a thread!!
I’m currently reading “The Future of Capitalism” by Paul Collier.
I’ve been really busy recently so I’m getting through it slowly but it’s insightful and thought provoking especially in today’s climate. He’s one of my fave Economists and writers because he speaks anecdotally, comes with facts but reads easily even for laymen. Great read for anyone interested in Economics and/or Politics.
 
At the edge of the Orchard by Tracy Chevalier, set in 19th century America, beautifully written, initially dark and bleak, but as the story unfolds it becomes happier. One of the central characters is a cook / sex worker in the hotels and guest houses supporting those searching for gold.
 
I have just ordered Stephen King's 'Under the Dome'. Hardly ever seen it in bookshops, despite him being a popular author for years. I enjoyed the first series that aired on Channel 5, but it seemed to go into decline. I've heard they greatly altered the ending, to the book, so I'm looking forward to Mr King's version.
 
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Going to start Ian Rankin, Watchman, tomorrow.
Many of his early and non-Rebus books aren't that good and give few signs of the greatness that was to come. But I've got this from the library and, after being pleasantly surprised by Westwind, hope this one will also be good :thumbsup:
I read Let It Bleed and found it good and the character appealing. Though it got a bit bogged down in too much detail of local politics. Will try another one when I've finished the Thomas Flashman one I've just started.
 
I read Let It Bleed and found it good and the character appealing. Though it got a bit bogged down in too much detail of local politics. Will try another one when I've finished the Thomas Flashman one I've just started.
One of his Rebus novels even gives an honourable mention to a place in Edinburgh I used to visit quite often back in the day...and I'm not talking about Avalanche Records!;)
 
The Elton John autobiography 'Me'.
I wouldn't say I was a massive fan of his music (his early to mid seventies is probably my favourite) but this is a hugely entertaining read full of self deprecating humour , diva strops and wonderful anecdotes about Freddie Mercury, Princess Diana and Michael Jackson to name but three.

Highly recommended. :thumbsup:
 
Going to start Ian Rankin, Watchman, tomorrow.
Many of his early and non-Rebus books aren't that good and give few signs of the greatness that was to come. But I've got this from the library and, after being pleasantly surprised by Westwind, hope this one will also be good :thumbsup:
Great series on novels at their best. There have been a few duff'uns as well for me (and the fact that technically Rebus must be 103 and still actively getting in scuffs :D). The good ones painted a really good character portrait, you can easily visualise Rebus falling asleep in his chair, listening to music, boozing heavily on whisky and generally being maudlin.
 
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Great series on novels at their best. There have been a few duff'uns as well for me (and the fact that technically Rebus must be 103 and still actively getting in scuffs :D). The good ones painted a really good character portrait, you can easily visualise Rebus falling asleep in his chair, listening to music, boozing heavily on whisky and generally being maudlin.
Rebus is, I believe, in his early 70s and about to venture forth from his flat in Marchmont later this year :drinks:
 
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I read Let It Bleed and found it good and the character appealing. Though it got a bit bogged down in too much detail of local politics. Will try another one when I've finished the Thomas Flashman one I've just started.
The Rebus books after Let It Bleed are much better than the early ones. The early ones are good, as you've seen, but the later ones are outstanding. :music:
 
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Ben Aaronovitch - Rivers of London. As I've managed pick up almost the whole series in discount shops, I thought it was about time I actually started reading them. Not read a novel since the first Harry Potter, so wasn't sure I could still do it, but it's going down easily enough.
 
Ben Aaronovitch - Rivers of London. As I've managed pick up almost the whole series in discount shops, I thought it was about time I actually started reading them. Not read a novel since the first Harry Potter, so wasn't sure I could still do it, but it's going down easily enough.
Just finished the latest one "False Value" - a really enjoyable series. The graphic novels that fill in the time gaps between the novels are excellent too
 
The Five by Hallie Rubenhold. The untold lives of the five women murdered by Jack the Ripper, fascinating and stirred many emotions. The back stories of random murder victims are often untold and makes you realise it could happen to anyone.
Currently doing a book cull and have enough unread books to read one a week for next two years..
 
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The Five by Hallie Rubenhold. The untold lives of the five women murdered by Jack the Ripper, fascinating and stirred many emotions. The back stories of random murder victims are often untold and makes you realise it could happen to anyone.
Currently doing a book cull and have enough unread books to read one a week for next two years..
Thanks for this. Found it online and ordered a copy! 👍
 
I've seen those about and I think there's a book/GN timeline on Amazon.
There's a timeline at the back of each of the graphic novels too - shows nicely where each one fits in.

The two mediums tailor nicely together - not necessary to read the graphic novels but they do explain some of the throwaway remarks in the books
 
Factfulness by Hans Rosling. A fabulous read! It discusses our misinterpretation of data, deterring us from making better decisions moving forward. The reason to that is simply 10 very basic, intrinsic human instincts the author creatively illustrates & offers the answers on how to overcome those. The data he tackles is mainly about income levels, population, access to education etc etc, it truly puts numbers into perspective & his own insistence all along the book the world is far better than we might actually think, this is proven time & again. But on an individual level, if anyone could relate those instincts to his/her own personal/professional lives, the approach & results might drastically be better.
 
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Book called Catholic Lancashire by JA Hilton, which is about the religion, culture & history of the places I was intending to visit during my Clitheroe to Lytham walk at Easter (which will hopefully take place next year).

Fascinating stuff, and the recusants, having been bolstered by the Irish, then the Italians, have now been joined by more.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-lancashire-36913044

But now I am only reading about the places, not visiting them :(
 
The Rise And Fall Of The Third Reich by William Shirer.
Frightening, fascinating looking into the madness of the Third Reich. A bit wandering at times but well worth the read, a warning about the hard right starting up here.
Thanks for the recommendation 👍
 
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John Lewis Stempel, The Running Hare
https://www.bookword.co.uk/the-running-hare-the-secret-life-of-farmland-by-john-lewis-sempel/
Author takes an intensive arable farm and converts it into a traditional English wheatfield complete with flora & fauna over the year. Battling against the elements and his neighbours, he... I don't know, I haven't finished it yet!
Look forward to doing so during my wfh tomorrow as the first half is really good.
Great book, as are all of his!
 
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Reading for Easter. The complete poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins, & an audiobook of the proverbs of King Solomon & Ecclesiastes.
CS Lewis- The Four Loves
Graham Greene- The Power & the Glory
Christopher Howse- A Pilgrim In Spain (want to do the camino one day tho this my have to wait until I'm retired).
JA Hilton- Catholic Lancashire (about the places I should have been in now :dash:

Although not books, been listening to a lot of culturally themed radio during the wfh.
 
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Reading for Easter. The complete poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins, & an audiobook of the proverbs of King Solomon & Ecclesiastes.
CS Lewis- The Four Loves
Graham Greene- The Power & the Glory
Christopher Howse- A Pilgrim In Spain (want to do the camino one day tho this my have to wait until I'm retired).
JA Hilton- Catholic Lancashire (about the places I should have been in now :dash:

Although not books, been listening to a lot of culturally themed radio during the wfh.
Don't know why I'm wasting my time with all this, when you only need to read two books and then you'll know everything!

View attachment 17802
 
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Just finished reading Sapiens ( A Brief History of Mankind ) by Yuval Noah Harare.
With the current events it brings home the fact we have fucked everything up and we' were basically better off as simple hunter gathers.
 
recently came across the novel by John Berger title : G - pub 1972, It's an old paperback stuck in the back of the bookshelf and the cheap paper is faded and yellowed and most of the pages are loose but they're all there. I don't remember anything about it but the first few pages are drawing me in so I think it's going to be a good read.
 
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